Posts Tagged ‘Sriracha’

Pancakes and Pinot Noir

July 27, 2013

So…

I’ve been rethinking the way I look at food.

Let’s take pancakes, for example.  I have never been a pancake-for-breakfast type of guy.

They’re way too filling.  They’re way too sweet.  They’re almost always made from some crappy mix from a box that’s been sitting in the back of somebody’s pantry for way too long.

But…

When we change the idea of a pancake from a fluffy, sugary breakfast food to that of a hearty, crisp, savory meal… Well… That’s something I can get into.

So…

The other day, I was watching The Chew.  On this episode, guest chef, Ming Tsai, showed how to make a simple, savory pancake out of leftover Chinese food.

It looked so tasty…

So good…

So not like a traditional pancake…

I just had to make my own version (without the leftovers).

So, here’s what I did…

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I mixed together 2 cups of flour with one cup of warm water until it became one fluffy ball. I kneaded the dough for about ten minutes, then left it in a bowl (covered by a damp towel) for about an hour.

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While the dough was resting, I chopped up about a quarter of a cabbage and two scallions, and threw them in a bowl.

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I rolled out half of the dough really thin, brushed it in olive oil, sprinkled in some salt, and covered the dough with the half of the cabbage and scallions. I then rolled up the dough, pulled it apart into two smaller pieces, and rolled each piece into a 7″ pancake. I proceeded to make two more pancakes with the rest of the dough.

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Each of the pancakes was cooked over medium heat in an omelet pan with a little bit of olive oil for about 3 and a half minutes each side. To finish the pancake, I topped it with some prosciutto and a little bit of the leftover cabbage and scallions.

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To serve, the pancake was cut into four slices, topped with a drizzle of Sriracha, and accompanied by a butter lettuce salad with a spicy peanut vinaigrette.

Wow!

I was really happy with how this turned out.  The pancake is crisp and chewy.  The cabbage and scallions give the pancake an earthy flavor.  The prosciutto gives a delicate meaty flavor, while the Sriracha adds a spicy complexity.

Now…

You know I’ve gotta have some wine with this.

Here’s what I chose…

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VINTJS 2012 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Trader Joe’s keeps surprising me with the quality of juice they are bringing for price.  In a world where people are obsessing over Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley of Oregon, usually the entry-level wines from this region come in at $20.

So…

When I saw this wine for $8, I had to get it.

Color: Very light ruby.  I know Pinot Noir is always going to be light, but this is one of the lightest I’ve ever seen.

Nose: Upon first inspection, the fruit on this wine is hard to miss.  Though it does dissipate as the wine opens up, initially, all I could really get was fresh raspberries.  Notes of maraschino cherries, whipped cream, and even some lettuce leaf begin to appear over time.

Taste: Though dry, I can’t help but think of a summertime dessert of cherry, raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry tart when tasting this wine.  There are some good notes of vanilla, spice, clove, and tobacco leaf.  While pretty, the wine finishes a bit thin for me.

Score: Make no mistake.  If you really want to know what Willamette Valley Pinot Noir tastes like, this not the wine for you.  But… If you want a quality wine for 8 bones, this will do the trick.  88 points.

With Food: I am really happy with this pairing.  The savory, salty, and spicy pancake highlights notes of tea leaf and tobacco in the wine.  It provides a good body and depth of flavor to the wine as well.  The peanut dressing on the salad continues to provide a great earthiness I felt was lacking in the wine.

Do yourself a favor…

The next time you’re thinking about pancakes, put down that maple syrup and grab the Pinot Noir instead.

Stay Rad,

Jeff

What wine would you pair with your favorite pancake? Leave a comment, and let us know.

Trione with Ceviche Tacos

February 26, 2013

The other night, I was in the mood for something different…

So I made this…

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Ceviche Tacos with Swai, Mango, Avocado, Chiles, and Sriracha

I had some more Tasting Room samples from Trione so I cracked them open to see what was doing.

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Trione 2008 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

The Trione 2008 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir is open-top fermented, and is a blend of three clones (115, 667, and 777).  It’s got that light elegance that I really enjoy in a Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.  There are some really tasty mushroom flavors in this wine.  The Ceviche Tacos bring out a nice peppery note in the wine.  This is a solid 89 point wine at $35.

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Trione 2008 Russian River Valley Syrah

Quite a bit of the Trione 2008 Russian River Valley Syrah is fermented as whole berry clusters in open top fermenters.  The Syrah is hand-plunged up to four times a day.  This is not your standard warm-climate Syrah.  The cool Russian River Valley reels in the sometimes over-extracted fruit.  The palate is full of yummy cherries and earthy tobacco.  The Ceviche Tacos highlight a plumminess in the wine.  At 90 points, this $32 Syrah is well worth it.

Stay Rad,

Jeff

What wine would you pair with Ceviche Tacos?  Leave a comment, and let us know.

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