Pancakes and Pinot Noir


I’ve been rethinking the way I look at food.

Let’s take pancakes, for example.  I have never been a pancake-for-breakfast type of guy.

They’re way too filling.  They’re way too sweet.  They’re almost always made from some crappy mix from a box that’s been sitting in the back of somebody’s pantry for way too long.


When we change the idea of a pancake from a fluffy, sugary breakfast food to that of a hearty, crisp, savory meal… Well… That’s something I can get into.


The other day, I was watching The Chew.  On this episode, guest chef, Ming Tsai, showed how to make a simple, savory pancake out of leftover Chinese food.

It looked so tasty…

So good…

So not like a traditional pancake…

I just had to make my own version (without the leftovers).

So, here’s what I did…


I mixed together 2 cups of flour with one cup of warm water until it became one fluffy ball. I kneaded the dough for about ten minutes, then left it in a bowl (covered by a damp towel) for about an hour.


While the dough was resting, I chopped up about a quarter of a cabbage and two scallions, and threw them in a bowl.


I rolled out half of the dough really thin, brushed it in olive oil, sprinkled in some salt, and covered the dough with the half of the cabbage and scallions. I then rolled up the dough, pulled it apart into two smaller pieces, and rolled each piece into a 7″ pancake. I proceeded to make two more pancakes with the rest of the dough.


Each of the pancakes was cooked over medium heat in an omelet pan with a little bit of olive oil for about 3 and a half minutes each side. To finish the pancake, I topped it with some prosciutto and a little bit of the leftover cabbage and scallions.


To serve, the pancake was cut into four slices, topped with a drizzle of Sriracha, and accompanied by a butter lettuce salad with a spicy peanut vinaigrette.


I was really happy with how this turned out.  The pancake is crisp and chewy.  The cabbage and scallions give the pancake an earthy flavor.  The prosciutto gives a delicate meaty flavor, while the Sriracha adds a spicy complexity.


You know I’ve gotta have some wine with this.

Here’s what I chose…


VINTJS 2012 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Trader Joe’s keeps surprising me with the quality of juice they are bringing for price.  In a world where people are obsessing over Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley of Oregon, usually the entry-level wines from this region come in at $20.


When I saw this wine for $8, I had to get it.

Color: Very light ruby.  I know Pinot Noir is always going to be light, but this is one of the lightest I’ve ever seen.

Nose: Upon first inspection, the fruit on this wine is hard to miss.  Though it does dissipate as the wine opens up, initially, all I could really get was fresh raspberries.  Notes of maraschino cherries, whipped cream, and even some lettuce leaf begin to appear over time.

Taste: Though dry, I can’t help but think of a summertime dessert of cherry, raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry tart when tasting this wine.  There are some good notes of vanilla, spice, clove, and tobacco leaf.  While pretty, the wine finishes a bit thin for me.

Score: Make no mistake.  If you really want to know what Willamette Valley Pinot Noir tastes like, this not the wine for you.  But… If you want a quality wine for 8 bones, this will do the trick.  88 points.

With Food: I am really happy with this pairing.  The savory, salty, and spicy pancake highlights notes of tea leaf and tobacco in the wine.  It provides a good body and depth of flavor to the wine as well.  The peanut dressing on the salad continues to provide a great earthiness I felt was lacking in the wine.

Do yourself a favor…

The next time you’re thinking about pancakes, put down that maple syrup and grab the Pinot Noir instead.

Stay Rad,


What wine would you pair with your favorite pancake? Leave a comment, and let us know.


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4 Responses to “Pancakes and Pinot Noir”

  1. Martin D. Redmond Says:

    I make a savory cheesecake…same concept something that’s traditionally sweet…but made savory. Enjoyed the post!

  2. Martin D. Redmond Says:

    Here’s the recipe for the savory chicken salsa cheesecake:

    Give it a try, it can be an appetizer or a main dish!

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